December 21, 2016

Upcoming Events
Contents
MFA, WCO & PNAAW Symposium '17 Set for Jan. 23-25 at Wisconsin Dells
NAFA Asks Farmers and Industry for Alfalfa Checkoff Research Input
Keys to Success: What I Learned from Long-Time Cover Crop Farmers
Starch and Fiber Digestibility: A Balancing Act
The Importance of Resistance Management on the Farm
Mid-December Midwestern Hay Market Steady to Weaker
Online Horse Pasture & Hay Courses Begin Next Month
MFA Board Meeting is January 23
Return Your MFA Ballots Before January 6!
Take Advantage of MFA's "Members-Only" Research Database
"Hay," Mark Your Calendar
2016 Sponsors
Contact Us
MFA Website
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MFA, WCO & PNAAW Symposium '17 Set for Jan. 23-25 at Wisconsin Dells

Harvest equipment impacts on forage quality and shrink loss, how forage producers can utilize remote sensing tools, and managing the yield-vs-quality tradeoff with reduced-lignin alfalfa. These are just a few of nearly 30 Symposium ’17 sessions to be offered Jan. 23-25 at Chula Vista Resort, Wisconsin Dells.

This annual event, hosted by the Midwest Forage Association (MFA), the Wisconsin Custom Harvesters (WCO), and the Professional Nutrient Applicators Association of Wisconsin (PNAAW), combines each organization’s annual meetings with a plethora of educational opportunities. Click here for the complete article.

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NAFA Asks Farmers and Industry for Alfalfa Checkoff Research Input

The National Alfalfa & Forage Alliance (NAFA) encourages alfalfa farmers and industry representatives to weigh in on research topics they feel are priorities to fund via the U.S. Alfalfa Farmer Research Initiative. This first-ever farmer-funded alfalfa-checkoff investment in alfalfa-related research – to help drive innovation and profitability in the alfalfa industry – will get under way in January.

To make your research wishes known, visit NAFA’s website at www.alfalfa.org. Survey results will be utilized in establishing research priorities for the first call for proposals to be announced later this spring. Click here for the complete article.

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Keys to Success: What I Learned from Long-Time Cover Crop Farmers
Ted Bay, University of Wisconsin-Extension Crops & Farm Management Agent, Grant & Lafayette counties

Persistence, flexibility, and experimentation reflect the attributes and practices of long-time cover crop farmers. They have adopted cover crops as a means of improving farm performance, and they strive to learn how they can continue to improve that performance. Cover crop benefits are managed between or alongside grain crops to achieve top yields in the main crop while adjusting to adverse or even favorable weather occurring during the growing season.

Using cover crops for the first time means there are a number of new production management issues to consider. Decisions will include what cover crop to use, when and how it is planted, changes to herbicide programs, how to terminate the cover crop, and practices to maintain crop insurance when using cover crops. Experienced cover crop farmers can recite a long list of cover crop benefits, but they realize they may not see all benefits every year. They have adopted a long-term view that they will manage their cover crops as well as they manage their other crop enterprises and capture the benefits that their farms and weather bring. Click here for the complete article.

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Starch and Fiber Digestibility: A Balancing Act
Phil Krueger, Mycogen Seeds Dairy Nutritionist

Consistently achieving high milk production requires performing a balancing act. The goal is to produce the most milk, with the greatest market value possible, for the least cost. The cornerstone of most rations supporting high production while maintaining excellent animal health is high-quality forage.

Along with high-quality forage, supplemental sources of digestible fiber, proteins, and starches are keys to balancing the cow’s dietary requirements. Producers who grow the majority of their feedstuffs must allocate use of those assets to the cattle groups that can utilize them economically while meeting the logistical needs of the dairy. Click here for the complete article.

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The Importance of Resistance Management on the Farm
Duane Rathmann, Technical Service Representative, BASF

Not a single grower has ever made the claim that farming is easy. Every year, growers face new challenges and must adapt to the rapidly changing industry. Perhaps the most challenging change is the increasing resistance to weeds, diseases, and insects. When resistance occurs, pest management usually becomes more difficult, more expensive, and crop yields may suffer.

Resistance to glyphosate and other herbicides is generally the first issue thought of when growers hear about resistance management. But it is important to consider fungicide and insecticide resistance as well. Practicing proper stewardship when using crop protection technologies can help curb resistance issues and keep land free of pests. Click here for the complete article.

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Mid-December Midwestern Hay Market Steady to Weaker
Fae Holin, MFA Communication Specialist

The mid-December hay market looks to be steady to weaker with quality hay supply still sparse. The following are the most recent prices available at presstime. Click here for the complete article.

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Online Horse Pasture & Hay Courses Begin Next Month

Two six-week, online certificate courses ̶ one on horse pasture establishment and management and the other on growing and feeding horse hay ̶ will be offered by the University of Minnesota Extension Horse Team starting in January 2017. Although species recommendations will focus on the Upper Midwest, most information can be applied across the U.S. Click here for the complete article.

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MFA Board Meeting is January 23

The Midwest Forage Association will be holding a meeting of its Board of Directors at 6:00 p.m., Monday, January 23, 2017. The meeting will be held in the Sierra Vista Room of the Chula Vista Resort, Wisconsin Dells, WI. If you have anything you would like the board to address, please call our office at 651.484.3888.

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Return Your MFA Ballots Before January 6!

Make a special effort to return your MFA board member ballot form as soon as possible. The deadline for returning ballots is January 6.

The election of MFA board members is an important aspect of MFA membership as these are the individuals who will be representing your interests on the board of directors for the next three years. Therefore, please take a moment to return your ballot today. Don't forget to renew your membership for 2017 as well!

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Take Advantage of MFA's "Members-Only" Research Database

As an MFA member, one of the most valuable resources at your disposal is MFA's "Members-Only" Research Database, a one-stop-shop for all of your forage research needs. MFA's Research Database features every Clippings and Forage Focus research article, as well as each MFRP final report. You can also change and personalize your password after signing in. Proceedings (and videos where appropriate) will also be archived a year after the meeting date. Your user name and password can be found on your MFA membership card or by contacting the MFA office at mfa@midwestforage.org.

"Hay," Mark Your Calendar!

  • 2017 Sheboygan County Forage Council Annual Meeting
    January 20
    10:30 a.m.
    Chissy's, Waldo, WI



  • 2017 MFA Symposium & Annual Meeting
    Monday - Wednesday, January 23-25
    Chula Vista Resort
    Wisconsin Dells, WI



  • Outagamie County Forage Council Winter Meeting
    January 26, 2017
    Doxbee's, Seymour, WI



  • Minnesota Tour de Forage Meetings
    January 31-Feb. 2, 2017
    Jan. 31 - Southeast
    Feb. 1 - Central
    Feb. 2 - Northeast



  • Calumet County Forage Council Annual Meeting
    February 8
    10 a.m.
    Neighborhood Bar & Grill, Brant, WI



  • Waupaca County Forage Council Winter Meeting
    February 9
    9:30 a.m.
    Bear Lake Resort, Manawa, WI



  • Dodge County Forage Council Winter Meeting
    February 10
    Dodge County Administration Bldg, Juneau, WI



  • Shawano County Forage Council Winter Meeting
    February 16
    10:30 a.m.
    Main Event, Cecil, WI
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2016 Sponsors
Charter Sponsors appear bolded
Gold Level - $5,000
BASF
CROPLAN By Winfield United
Forage Genetics International
Kemin Industries
Monsanto
NEXGROW
Promote, Cargill's additives brand
S&W Seed Company
Silver Level - $2,500

Alforex Seeds
Dairyland Seed Co.
DuPont Pioneer
La Crosse Seed
MacDon
Mycogen Seeds
W-L Research  

Bronze Level - $1,500
Ag-Bag
Eisentraut Ag Services - ROC
Allied Level - $500
Ag Spectrum
Agassiz Seed & Supply
Albert Lea Seed House
Bag Man - Secure Covers
Barenbrug USA
Byron Seeds
CLAAS of America
Country Visions Cooperative
CP Feeds
Dairyland Laboratories
Gruett's
Gypsoil
Hay & Forage Grower
Innovative Forage Solutions
Investors Community Bank
John Deere
Krone NA
Kuhn North America
Legacy Seeds
Meyer Manufacturing
Mid-States Equipment
Mountain View Seeds
New Holland
RCI Engineering
Riesterer & Schnell
Rock River Laboratory
Stearns DHIA Laboratories
Taunton & Meyer CPA
Vanderloop Equipment
Vincent, Urban, Walker & Associates, Inc.
Vita Plus
Midwest Forage Association - 4630 Churchill St #1 - St. Paul, MN 55126
651-484-3888 - mfa@midwestforage.org - www.midwestforage.org
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